Todd’s Walk for Water

Do you remember the last time you had to walk 22 miles? What about walking 22 miles in order to meet your basic needs? For many of us, walking such a distance is a reality we will never understand.

We heard from Titus who took on the challenge of walking 22 miles to raise money to donate to East Asia to aid in providing clean water, you can read that story here. Now, we’d like to share Todd’s experience.

Todd, pictured above in the black shirt, took on the 22-mile challenge with his friends Alex and Eden. He has previously visited India with Titus – the pair met as youth pastors on a mission trip in India – and has seen firsthand the reality of those who live without clean drinking water.

When asked why he took on the challenge, he stated:
“I believe every person should have the ability to have clean drinking water. And I think about having to get up and walk over an hour up the side of a mountain to find water in a hole that not one of us would ever dream of getting water from.”

“…I’m 48 years old and thinking about people my age or older having to get up and make that walk breaks my heart…it took me 4 days to recover.”

Upon deciding to take on the 22-mile walk, Todd became aware of other challenges that individuals living without clean water would have to face.
“…I’m 48 years old and thinking about people my age or older having to get up and make that walk breaks my heart…it took me 4 days to recover. I go back to say ‘everyone deserves a chance to have clean drinking water’.”

Todd has been an incredible advocate for our clean water project and his 22-mile walk raised $2,575 to help support our efforts to ensure people in East Asia have clean water.

We are inspired by Todd’s dedication to simulating an experience that is part of some people’s everyday life to best understand how he can serve his neighbors.


This story is an example of just one of the many lives being impacted throughout our communities. We are so greatful for your generous support and commitment to helping us break the cycle of generational poverty.